Private learning implies quantum stability

Part of Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 34 pre-proceedings (NeurIPS 2021)

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Authors

Yihui Quek, Srinivasan Arunachalam, John Smolin

Abstract

Learning an unknown n-qubit quantum state rho is a fundamental challenge in quantum computing. Information-theoretically, it is known that tomography requires exponential in n many copies of rho to estimate its entries. Motivated by learning theory, Aaronson et al. introduced many (weaker) learning models: the PAC model of learning states (Proceedings of Royal Society A'07), shadow tomography (STOC'18) for learning shadows" of a state, a model that also requires learners to be differentially private (STOC'19) and the online model of learning states (NeurIPS'18). In these models it was shown that an unknown state can be learnedapproximately" using linear in n many copies of rho. But is there any relationship between these models? In this paper we prove a sequence of (information-theoretic) implications from differentially-private PAC learning to online learning and then to quantum stability.Our main result generalizes the recent work of Bun, Livni and Moran (Journal of the ACM'21) who showed that finite Littlestone dimension (of Boolean-valued concept classes) implies PAC learnability in the (approximate) differentially private (DP) setting. We first consider their work in the real-valued setting and further extend to their techniques to the setting of learning quantum states. Key to our results is our generic quantum online learner, Robust Standard Optimal Algorithm (RSOA), which is robust to adversarial imprecision. We then show information-theoretic implications between DP learning quantum states in the PAC model, learnability of quantum states in the one-way communication model, online learning of quantum states, quantum stability (which is our conceptual contribution), various combinatorial parameters and give further applications to gentle shadow tomography and noisy quantum state learning.