SEVIR : A Storm Event Imagery Dataset for Deep Learning Applications in Radar and Satellite Meteorology

Part of Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 33 pre-proceedings (NeurIPS 2020)

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Authors

Mark Veillette, Siddharth Samsi, Chris Mattioli

Abstract

<p>Modern deep learning approaches have shown promising results in meteorological applications like precipitation nowcasting, synthetic radar generation, front detection and several others. In order to effectively train and validate these complex algorithms, large and diverse datasets containing high-resolution imagery are required. Petabytes of weather data, such as from the Geostationary Environmental Satellite System (GOES) and the Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) system, are available to the public; however, the size and complexity of these datasets is a hindrance to developing and training deep models. To help address this problem, we introduce the Storm EVent ImagRy (SEVIR) dataset - a single, rich dataset that combines spatially and temporally aligned data from multiple sensors, along with baseline implementations of deep learning models and evaluation metrics, to accelerate new algorithmic innovations. SEVIR is an annotated, curated and spatio-temporally aligned dataset containing over 10,000 weather events that each consist of 384 km x 384 km image sequences spanning 4 hours of time. Images in SEVIR were sampled and aligned across five different data types: three channels (C02, C09, C13) from the GOES-16 advanced baseline imager, NEXRAD vertically integrated liquid mosaics, and GOES-16 Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) flashes. Many events in SEVIR were selected and matched to the NOAA Storm Events database so that additional descriptive information such as storm impacts and storm descriptions can be linked to the rich imagery provided by the sensors. We describe the data collection methodology and illustrate the applications of this dataset with two examples of deep learning in meteorology: precipitation nowcasting and synthetic weather radar generation. In addition, we also describe a set of metrics that can be used to evaluate the outputs of these models. The SEVIR dataset and baseline implementations of selected applications are available for download. </p>